The Cancer Wisdom Podcast

                     Published: September 29, 2023 Host: Simon Persson

Cancer surgeries don't improve your survival chances. Changing your toxic lifestyle does more to reverse cancer than surgeries. In this episode, you will learn the devastating history of cancer surgeries and why they still fail today.

You will also discover the disturbing side effects of cancer surgeries and why you should think twice before trying them.

More...

Legal Notice

The information is presented for educational purposes only and is not intended to diagnose, prescribe treat or cure cancer. This information is not intended as medical advice, please refer to a qualified healthcare professional.

Summary


  • Claudius Galen proposed that cancer was trapped black bile, unable to escape from the body.
  • Andreas Vesalius charted the paths of arteries, veins, nerves, and lymph nodes.
  • Matthew Bale was an anatomist who 1793 published a book for surgeons and anatomists.
  • In the 1760s, a Scottish surgeon called John Hunter started to remove tumors from his patients and classified them into stages.
  • William Morton demonstrated the first anesthesia.
  • In 1865, Joseph Lister found a way to reduce inflammation.
  • William Stuart Halstead began the concept of radical surgery.
  • Cancer surgery is when you remove the tumor or surrounding tissues during an operation.
  • During the biopsy, the surgeon cuts the skin and removes some of the suspicious tissues.
  • An incisional biopsy is when you remove a piece of the suspect area.
  • Extensional biopsy is when you remove the entire suspicious area, such as a mole or lump.
  • The main reason why doctors use surgery to remove cancer is to relieve pain if a tumor presses on a nerve or spinal cord.
  • Doctors also use surgeries to unblock the bowel or intestines, stop bleeding, or insert a feeding tube.
  • The most common side effects of surgery are pain in the treated area and infections.
  • When you remove your breast, you don't improve your survival outcomes compared to a breast-conserving surgery.
  • Prostate cancer is a common cancer type in men, and prostate cancer surgeries can be as shameful for men as breast cancer surgeries for women.
  • Brain surgery is dangerous because the brain is delicate and controls many functions of the body.
  • Few cancer patients respond well to surgery.
  • Cancer surgeries might only be helpful when there's a large growth in a vital pathway.
  • Late-stage cancers are still impossible to remove with surgery. 
  • Dr. Hardin B. Jones said in a report that the intensity of the surgery didn't affect the survival rates in verified malignancies.
  • Pharmaceutical companies manipulate cancer surgery statistics.
  • Cancer develops in the body because of toxins.
  • Surgery doesn't cure the underlying cause of cancer.

What You Should Do Before Cancer Surgeries

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Episode transcript:

Simon: Cancer surgery doesn't improve your survival chances. Changing your toxic lifestyle does more to reverse cancer than surgeries. In this episode, you will learn the devastating history of cancer surgery and why it still fails today.

You will also discover the disturbing side effects of this treatment and why you should think twice before trying it.

Intro jingle: Welcome to the Cancer Wisdom podcast. This podcast teaches you how to treat cancer with natural remedies without using toxic treatments. Discover how to take charge of your health and not be a slave to Big Pharma medicine. Here's your host, Simon Persson.

Simon: It's beneficial to look at history to learn more about his treatment and why it still fails. To begin the history of cancer surgery, we need to go back to 160 A.D. At that time, Claudius Galen was a writer and Greek doctor. And like Hippocrates, he classified all illnesses based on excesses of various fluids.

Galen believed that cancer and depression were due to excess black bile. He proposed that cancer was trapped black bile, unable to escape from the body.

And according to Galen, it was very difficult to treat cancer because there was black bile everywhere. You couldn't cut cancer out because the black bile would still flow right back. So Gallen died in Rome in 199 A.D., but his influence on medicine stretched for several centuries.

Most doctors at that time didn't want to remove tumors. They only did that in extreme situations. So we had to wait quite a long time before doctors tried to remove cancer with surgery. We need to start with Andreas Vesalius.

So, in 1533, he was 19 and a student at the University of Paris. He wanted to learn Galen's autonomy and start a surgery practice.

Autonomy is the study of the structural makeup of an organism or any of its parts. To Vesalius' shock, the autonomy lessons were horrible.  

Surgeons at that time didn't know anything about human organs. They just cut the body and learned as they went. So Vesalius then decided to create his own map of the body. He went to the graveyard to find dead bodies of prisoners.

And he started to cut them open and charted the paths of arteries, veins, nerves, and lymph nodes. The word autopsy comes from the Greek word to see for oneself. Vesalius decided to release his work to surgeons.

But one thing that Vesalius couldn't find was Galen's black bile. He could find red blood in the blood vessels and yellow bile in the liver but no black bile.

But Andreas Vesalius' discovery about the body was important 200 years later when it led to the first cancer surgery.

The next step in the history of cancer surgery was Matthew Bale, an anatomist. In 1793, he published a book for surgeons and anatomists. And like Vesalius, Bale couldn't find black bile.

And then he thought that if cancer were not caused by black bile, then you would be able to cut it away and remove the cancer. But during that time, surgery was not ready to do such operations.

In the 1760s, a Scottish surgeon called John Hunter started to remove tumors from his patients, and he classified tumors into stages.

He called early-stage cancers movable tumors or local cancers and called tumors that were advanced, invasive and spread throughout the body as immovable tumors.

Hunter concluded that only movable cancers were worth removing with surgery. He practiced his surgical skills on dead animals and thought operating on humans was dangerous.

When you operated, you had to deal with pain during surgery and infections. And they weren't able to deal with those issues at that time. People who underwent surgery often died more miserable deaths.

It wasn't until we discovered anesthesia that surgeons could operate without causing pain. So, in 1846, a Boston dentist called William Morton demonstrated the first anesthesia.

His patient was Edward Abbott, who had a swollen, malformed blood vessel. Morton asked Abbott to take a few puffs of a vapor.

When Abbott went to sleep, a surgeon made a small incision in Abbott's neck, and he didn't experience any pain. Anesthesia allowed surgeons to perform prolonged operations that often lasted several hours.  

But they still had one problem, and that was infections. Infections after surgery still remained, and until the 19th century, infections were often lethal. But in 1865, Joseph Lister found a way to reduce inflammation.  

So he found a 13-year-old boy who cut his arm while operating a machine at a fair in Glasgow. But instead of amputating his arm, Lister tried a salve of carbolic acid.

And for a few weeks, the whole situation seemed hopeless. But later, the arm started to dry up and heal.

After this success, Lister started to operate on cancer patients. In 1869, he removed a breast tumor from his sister, Isabella Pim,  on a dining table. His sister survived without an infection but died of liver complications three years later.

By the 1870s, Lister routinely operated on breast cancer. Later, he extended his surgery to the lymph nodes under the breast. Lister's discovery led to cancer surgery.

By the early 20th century, surgeons could remove many local cancers that didn't spread. But despite these remarkable advances, some cancers still remained and relapsed after surgery.

So, it was William Stuart Halstead who began the concept of radical surgery. He was a surgeon born in 1852, and he became fascinated by autonomy. Halstead saw the German surgeon Volkmann use aggressive surgeries to remove breast cancer.

But Volkmann had run into a wall. Even though the surgeries were extensive and exhaustive, the breast cancer still relapsed,

But despite hearing that, Halstead decided to dig even deeper into the breast, and he cut through the pectoralis major, a large muscle responsible for moving the shoulder and the hand. But  Halsted was not the only one who tried this.

Another man, Willy Meyer, was a surgeon operating in New York, and he arrived at the same conclusion in the 1890s. Halsted called his procedure radical mastectomy.

He used the word radical because it meant root in Latin, and Halsted wanted to find the root of cancer.

Later, Halstead didn't stop his surgery at the pectoralis major. So he cut even further down the chest where cancer still recurred after his radical mastectomy. And by 1898, Halsted's mastectomy had taken an even more radical turn.

So he began to slice through the collarbone and reach the lymph nodes. And despite his brutal surgery, he didn't have much success.

So Halsted believed that you had to remove every trace of cancer or otherwise the breast was unclean. But the problem was that it disrupted the flow of lymph. This operation also caused the arm to swell up like an elephant's leg.

And it often took his patients months or even years to recover. But Halsted just accepted that and continued his work, and thought it was inevitable to have these side effects.  

So Halsted's ability to cure cancer patients didn't have anything to do with radical mastectomy. Instead, it had to do with how big the cancer was and how much it had spread. It didn't matter that Halstead used aggressive surgery to remove tumors.

He only had success with small or local tumors. Later, he published data on the success of his mastectomies. Of 76 breast cancer patients treated with surgery, only 40 survived more than three years.

Radical surgery didn't improve survival rates. Instead, it disfigured women's bodies and created more suffering.

So, now that you know the history of cancer surgery, we can start to learn what cancer surgery is all about. Cancer surgery is when you remove the tumor or surrounding tissues during an operation.

So, it's often used to extract all or some of the cancerous tissues after a diagnosis. But you can also use it to diagnose cancer.   

During the biopsy, the surgeon makes a cut in the skin and removes some of the suspicious tissues. Incisional biopsy is when you remove a piece of the suspect area, and extensional biopsy is when you remove the entire suspicious area, such as a mole or lump.

After a biopsy, a pathologist analyzes laboratory tests, cells, tissues, or organs. The surgeon or oncologist makes the diagnosis after receiving the pathology report. They use it to decide the size of the tumor or a certain stage.  

The main reason why doctors use surgery to remove cancer is to relieve pain if a tumor presses on a nerve or spinal cord.

They use it to unblock the bowel or intestines so you can eat properly or to stop the bleeding in an area with many blood vessels.

Another reason they might do surgery is to insert a feeding tube or several tubes that deliver medications or to prevent broken bones weakened by cancer or cancer treatments.

Before the surgery, you will meet a surgeon or a surgical team, and they will review your medical record. They will then perform a physical examination and check if you need any surgery.  

And before your surgery, you might need certain tests. You can do a blood test to identify your blood type if something happens and you need a blood transfusion.

Or they might ask you to give a urine sample or have an electrocardiogram, EKG, or imaging scan.

So, there are many different side effects of cancer surgery. Most of the complications during surgery happen by the surgery itself, the drugs used, or your state of health. The more complicated the surgery is, the greater the risk of side effects.

Minor operations like biopsies often have less risk than bigger surgeries. The most common side effect of surgery is pain in the treated area. But another dangerous side effect is infections.

So, infections are used by the body to protect against a threat. Cutting up your body is seen as a threat to the body. Other side effects of surgery are due to the drugs used.

After surgery, you can experience bleeding or damage in nearby tissues or organs. Surgeries can also cause blood clots, and there can be a slow recovery of body functions.

There are many different types of cancer surgeries. One common is breast cancer surgery. Breast cancer surgeries are not effective against breast cancer.

And it also affects women's self-esteem. So it's very upsetting to see your deformed breasts in the mirror. Breast cancer surgeries often cause pain and tenderness in the treated area.

A common surgery of the breast is mastectomy,  and that's when you remove the breast. When you remove your breast, you don't improve your survival outcomes compared to a breast-conserving surgery.

Prostate cancer is a common cancer type in men, and prostate cancer surgeries can be as shameful for men as breast cancer surgeries for women.

There are many different complications during this procedure. Some side effects of this surgery are impotence, painful urination, or difficulty urinating.  

It's common for men to not experience an erection for 8 to 12 weeks after the surgery. There's also a loss in fertility.

Another dangerous cancer surgery is brain surgery. Brain surgery has many side effects, and it's really dangerous to operate on the brain because it's very delicate and controls many functions of the body.

Some side effects of brain surgery are infections, bleeding, seizures, stroke, coma, brain damage, swelling, and impaired speech.

I remember a couple of years ago when my friend's dad had brain cancer. One of the treatments he had was brain surgery, and after the surgery, he had a hard time speaking.

This man was one of the smartest guys that I knew. But after the surgery,  his days just consisted of sleeping, and he had a hard time forming words.

Another common cancer surgery is for colon cancer. Colon cancer surgery can also cause many problems for the patient.

Some of the side effects of this surgery are pain, bleeding, blood clots, diarrhea, abdominal adhesions, and damage to nearby organs.

Other side effects that you might not think about are sexual and bladder problems. If this treatment doesn't go well, you can become infertile.  

The success rate of cancer surgery is not that great. Even though it's the least intrusive cancer treatment, it's still not risk-free. So, the most common cancer surgeries are for the breast and the lung. G. Edward Griffin wrote the book World Without Cancer.

According to him, only 16% of breast cancer patients respond well to surgery, and he says surgery is only useful if the tumor severely affects vital nerves, arteries, and pathways of the colon.

For example, it might be useful when there's a large growth that obstructs the colon and makes it hard to digest food. Or when the tumor blocks the bile ducts of the liver or the trachea.

But this only occurs in 15 to 20 percent of these cancers. And they are also the only cases where a tumor may lead to complications.

So, to have any success with cancer surgery, the cancer needs to be small and in one place. When cancer spreads to secondary locations, surgery becomes useless because you can't just open up the body and remove all tumors.

That would take too much work. And in this case, you need to use other treatments,  such as radiotherapy or chemo. But they have even more dangerous side effects. What's interesting is that what surgeons discovered 200 years ago is still true today.

Even if we have more advanced technology, late-stage cancers are still impossible to remove with surgery.

We haven't made any advancements. So, surgery is still useless in treating advanced cancer. And the other treatments that we have are even worse than surgery.

So, there's no real evidence that cancer surgeries lead to any better life expectancy. Dr. Hardin B. Jones studied cancer patients for 25 years.

He analyzed clinical records of cancer patients and made a report to the American Cancer Society. He said in his report that the intensity of the surgery didn't affect the survival rates in verified malignancies.

But, the cancer industry still brags about high cure rates of cancer surgeries. According to Jones, the impressive figures have to do with how they report these stats.

So, usually, they have two groups: one group that gets surgery and a control group that doesn't receive any treatments.

When pharmaceutical companies find patients with a favorable cancer prognosis, they often get the label treated. And they are more likely to live longer, whether they are treated or not.

In the treated group, they often reject deaths that occur before the treatments are completed. Dead patients then get the label untreated. And according to Jones, the cancer death rate is the same whether you get treated or not.

Doctors measure the success of cancer treatments in five-year survival rates. If a doctor discovers early-stage cancer in a patient, for example, stage one cancer, and the patient then dies five years later, the patient is still considered a five-year success rate even if they are dead.  

Cancer surgery doesn't cure cancer. Like other orthodox cancer treatments, surgery only removes the tumor but not the underlying cause. As I have told in numerous episodes of this podcast, cancer develops in the body because of toxins.

If you want cancer to stop growing, you need to remove the toxins. Removing cancer with surgery is like neglecting your garden and treating your flowers or plants with toxic water and not using fertile soil, or not giving the plants enough sunshine.

If your plants start to wilt because of your neglect, taking a scissor and removing the dead leaves might make it look decent. But if you still continue to neglect your plants and do nothing to fix the issue,  the plants will start to die slowly.

If your plants start to discolor,  that is a sign that the soil is not nutrient enough. And the only way you can fix this issue is to make sure that the soil is fertile and has enough nutrients.

It's the same with cancer surgery. We can remove cancer time and again, but if we don't change our toxic habits, cancer will return. And we will still need to use surgery to remove the cancer.

So surgery is like sweeping your problems under the carpet. To heal from cancer, we need to address the underlying cause of cancer. So, just as there are physical laws, there are also laws of good health. Cancer doesn't just manifest from thin air.  

Many people believe that cancer is due to faulty genes and that there's nothing that we can do about it. But cancer only develops when we live a toxic and unbalanced lifestyle.   

There are several reasons why we might experience cancer. One reason is stress. So, when we are under stress, it distorts the energy field of the body, and that can manifest diseases. And the stress hormones also are detrimental to our health.  

If you eat a lot of animal products or processed foods, you can increase your cancer risk. Meat contains too much protein, fat, and cholesterol for our bodies. But if you feed your body the right foods, like vegetables, you can lower your cancer risk.

Other ways you can prevent cancer are to get enough sunshine, sleep or access to clean water. You can also lower your cancer risk by detoxing from heavy metals or using other remedies to clean your organs. And exercise can also be beneficial for your cancer healing.

When we address our stress and unhealthy eating habits, we can make the body work at full rate, and therefore, the toxins in the body will disappear. And then there's no reason for the body to create cancer cells anymore. And then we don't need to use surgery to remove them.

If we want to stop cancer,  we need to find a solution from nature and not use surgeries, chemo, or radiotherapy because they will never address the underlying cause of cancer. Before you undergo surgery, you should download our free cancer surgery questionnaire.

I created this questionnaire to aid you in knowing what to ask your oncologist during the initial or ongoing checkups. By knowing what to ask, you can take charge of the conversation and not let him use fear to force you into a decision that you will later regret. So, by asking the right questions, you can protect yourself from making a  hasty decision.

So you will learn incredible stuff by just asking the right questions. I will provide the link to this questionnaire in the show notes below. Thank you for listening to this episode, and I'll see you in the next one.

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About the Show

The Cancer Wisdom Podcast teaches you how to treat cancer with natural remedies without using toxic treatments.

Discover how to take charge of your health and not be a slave to Big Pharma medicine.

Your host:

Simon Persson


Simon Persson is a holistic cancer blogger passionate about natural health remedies. When he is not blogging, he enjoys nature, cooking, sports, and learning about the latest gadgets on the market.

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