The Cancer Wisdom Podcast

                     Published: November 24, 2023 Host: Simon Persson

Emotional trauma may trigger breast cancer. In this episode, I will talk about emotional causes of breast cancer. Discover the mechanism of how the body creates cancer in the breast and what you can do about it. 

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The information is presented for educational purposes only and is not intended to diagnose, prescribe treat or cure cancer. This information is not intended as medical advice, please refer to a qualified healthcare professional.

Summary


  • Breast cancer is the most invasive cancer in females worldwide.
  • There are higher rates of breast cancer in first-world nations compared to developing countries.
  • Breast cancer begins in the cells of the breast glands or the milk ducts.
  • Dr. Ryke Geerd Hamer made an astonishing connection between emotional trauma and cancer.
  • Dr. Hamer did brain scans of his cancer patients and asked them about their emotional trauma. 
  • A particular area of the brain control a specific organ.
  • Each conflict shock affects a unique part of the brain that relays it to the organ
  • Many cancer patients are often caring, dutiful, responsible, and hardworking people.
  • Most of them lack closeness to one or both parents.
  • An emotional struggle activates a particular biological program.
  • Cancer develops when you experience something in life that catches you off guard.
  • The conflict linked to the breast glands is a nest-worthy conflict.
  • Whether you're right or left-handed will determine where the breast cancer will grow.
  • The biological conflict linked to the milk ducts is a separation conflict.
  • Several studies show that emotional trauma increases the risk of cancer.
  • Olivia Newton-John got breast cancer because of separation conflicts she experienced in her life.

How To Let Go Of Emotional Causes Of Breast Cancer

1. Download The Breast Cancer Healing Protocol

2. Follow the guide



Discover How To Let Go Of Negative Emotions Behind Breast Cancer

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If you want to learn how to let go of the emotional trauma behind breast cancer, you can download our guide, The Breast Cancer Healing Protocol, for free. In this document, you will learn how to heal the emotional causes of breast cancer.

You will also learn different natural remedies you can use, such as eating a healthy diet or other healthy habits you can follow.

Resources:

Episode transcript:

Simon: Emotional trauma may trigger breast cancer. In this episode, I will talk about how stress can cause breast cancer. Discover the mechanism of how the body creates cancer in the breast and what you can do about it.

 Intro jingle: Welcome to the Cancer Wisdom podcast. This podcast teaches you how to treat cancer with natural remedies without using toxic treatments. Discover how to take charge of your health and not be a slave to Big Pharma medicine. Here's your host, Simon Persson.

Simon: Breast cancer is the most invasive cancer in females worldwide. It's also the main cause of cancer death in women after lung cancer. The vast majority of breast cancer cases occur in women, but they can also happen in men.

There are higher rates of breast cancer in first-world nations compared to developing countries. The breast contains billions of microscopic cells, and breast cancer begins in the cells of the breast glands or the milk ducts. A lump in the breast is often the first symptom of breast cancer.

Other symptoms include pain in the armpits, rash around the nipple, or skin on the nipple peel, scale, or flake. Or you can find redness of skin, swelling in the armpit or nipple discharge, or the size or shape of the breast changes.

One primary cause of breast cancer not many people talk about is stress. And the man who made this discovery was Dr. Ryke Geerd Hamer. He's the founder of German New Medicine and made an astonishing connection between emotional trauma and cancer.

His discovery began when his son died, and not soon after that, he developed testicular cancer. At the same time, he worked at a cancer clinic in Munich, Germany.

And he thought it was strange that he all of a sudden got cancer when he was previously healthy and didn't have any serious illnesses. He wanted to know if the trauma from his son's death caused his cancer.

And since he worked at a cancer clinic, he wanted to know if his patients had experienced something emotional before their cancer.

Dr. Hamer did brain scans of his cancer patients and asked them about their emotional trauma. He collected data from thousands of patients. And when he was finished and looked at the data,  he found specific patterns.

Dr. Hamer compared the CT scan with the patient's medical records and history and discovered that his patients experienced an unexpected shock before their cancer diagnosis.

Hamer found out that a particular area of the brain controlled a specific organ, and he also discovered that each conflict shock affects a unique part of the brain that relays it to the organ.

When he looked at the CT scans, he saw some concentric rings on the scans. The same spot in the brain lit up when a patient had a particular cancer.

Every cancer has a distinct conflict shock. Hamer learned that diseases run in two phases. First, we have the active conflict phase that activates the moment that we have a shock.

 Cancer often grows in the active phase, and the moment we resolve the conflict, we enter the healing phase. The emotional trauma that cancer patients feel often starts in childhood. They often felt rejection, abandonment, betrayal, shame, or injustice.

Some people have experienced a combination of those wounds. Cancer manifests after they suppress these feelings and reach their emotional limit.

And because of the trauma they have experienced during childhood, they are more sensitive to stressful situations.

And that can be why some people develop cancer when they experience something traumatic, while other people that didn't have this childhood trauma may handle these situations better and not develop cancer.

 I have discovered that many cancer patients are often caring, dutiful, responsible, and hardworking people. They have a strong tendency to carry other people's burdens and often worry for others.

Most of them didn't receive their parents' love and, therefore, have a deep-seated need to make others happy. Many of them are people pleasers with a high need for approval. Therefore, they have a hard time saying no to other people.

I have also learned that most of them lack closeness to one or both parents and sometimes that can lead to a lack of closeness with their spouse. Many cancer patients also have long-suppressed toxic emotions such as anger, resentment, or hostility, and they may also have great difficulty expressing their feelings.

And because of this emotional trauma, they react adversely to stress and are bad at coping with it. Stress is a normal part of our biology.

Our bodies go into fight-or-flight mode if there's an immediate danger. The danger causes a specific biological response. Both animals and humans experience these conflict shocks.

But the difference between humans and animals is that humans can think. Our bodies can't see the difference between an imagined and real situation.

An emotional struggle activates a particular biological program. And it's not the situation that causes the shock, but our perception of it. Three people can face the same challenge but have three different reactions. Our response depends on our beliefs, values, or vulnerabilities.

Cancer develops when you experience something in life that catches you off guard. And only after looking at the symptoms can you know what emotional conflict caused it.

So, there's a difference between physical and psychological stress. Physical stress is when we are in real danger, such as a predator chasing us.

And psychological stress is caused by our thinking. We can experience this even if we are safe and lie in a warm bed at night.

There are two fundamental types of breast cancer: glandular and ductal breast cancer. I will first talk about the emotional conflict tied to glandular breast cancer, and then I will talk about cancer in the breast ducts.

I will now talk about cancer in the breast glands. The function of the breast glands is to produce milk to feed babies. When a woman breastfeeds her baby, the milk travels through a network of milk ducts to the nipple.

In biological terms, the female breast is synonymous with carrying and nurturing. The cerebellum in the brain controls the breast glands. You can find the cerebellum in the lower back part of the brain. It accounts for around 10% of the brain's total weight, and it contains as many as 80% of all neurons.

According to Dr. Hamer, the conflict linked to the breast glands is a nest-worthy conflict. It's when you worry about the well-being of a loved one, including a pet. This conflict can also be the distress in the nest, like a woman's home or workplace.

This conflict can also activate when you have an argument conflict with a partner, child, parent, or friend. But this argument has a worry aspect to it.

During the conflict phase, the breast gland cells multiply. The biological purpose of the cell increase is to boost the milk production of the breast glands. The growth corresponds to the intensity of your conflict. If you have a very stressful conflict with a person, your cells can grow faster.

Milk is for the nest member in need. A woman's breasts respond to the worry conflict, even if she's not breastfeeding anymore. This is because a woman associates the bond with her children or partners with her breasts.

And what's interesting is that whether you're right or left-handed will determine where the breast cancer will grow. For example, a right-handed woman will respond with the left breast if she has a conflict with her child or mother.

A left-handed person has a partner conflict with the left breast. And a right-handed person will have a partner conflict with her right breast.

A right-handed woman feeds her child on the left side so she can have her right arm free because that's her dominant hand. Therefore, she associates the bond between her child with the left breast and the connection with her mom.

A left-handed person feeds her child on the right side. Therefore, if she has a conflict with her child, she will develop cancer in the right breast and cancer in the left breast if she has a partner conflict. A partner can be a husband, a friend, a brother, a sister, a father, or a business partner.

So, let's take an example. Let's say the woman in this example is right-handed, and her daughter was in an accident, and she starts to worry about her health.

Because she is right-handed, she connects the left breast with her child, and therefore, she will develop breast cancer in the left breast if the situation comes out of the blue and shocks her.

A woman can create emotional trauma with her child if the child has been in an accident or is taking drugs. Or she can worry about her daughter's divorce or her mother's health problems. Throughout this conflict, the nursing mother has more milk in the conflict-related breast.

Men also have mammary glands. But, men's breasts remain undeveloped because of their higher testosterone levels. In females, estrogen promotes the development of the breasts.

And the only way a man can develop breast cancer is if he has a low level of testosterone. And if he has a nest worry conflict like a woman, he can also develop cancer.

Now, I will talk about the emotional conflict of the milk ducts. The milk ducts are controlled by the sensory cortex, which is part of the cerebral cortex. You can find the cerebral cortex on the brain's outermost layer.

The cerebral cortex carries out essential functions of your brain, such as memory, thinking, learning reasoning, problem-solving, emotions, consciousness, and sensory functions.

The milk ducts in the right breast are controlled from the left side of the cortex. And the milk ducts in the left breast are controlled from the right cortical hemisphere.

The milk ducts attach to the lobules of the breast glands, and they merge into the main mammary ducts at the nipple. According to Dr. Hamer, the biological conflict linked to the milk ducts is a separation conflict.

It's a feeling that a loved one was torn from my breast. In this case, a loved person can be a child, mother, partner, spouse, sibling, or friend.  

The woman can no longer nurture or take care of this person, and therefore, the biological program starts. So, there can be several reasons why this separation conflict happens.

For example, it can be the death of a loved one, including a pet, or a fear of losing someone you love. Or you might experience a breakup with a partner, child, or parent, or your friend can move away, and you can't see them anymore.

The fear of separation can also activate the conflict. For example, you might want to separate from a partner or parent if you don't get along, if she experiences a betrayal from her husband,  or has an abusive relationship. But a separation from a home can also create a conflict in the milk ducts.

The biological purpose of the cell loss is to widen the ducts so that the milk can drain off easier. When the woman can no longer nurture the nest member, she doesn't need to produce milk in a biological sense.

I found Dr. Hamer's discovery that emotional trauma can cause cancer really interesting, and I wanted to see if there were any examples. So, I looked at some studies, and I found a Greek study that found that traumatic life events preceded tumor growth.

In this study, group A had 813 breast cancer patients and group B had 685 women without cancer. And the study found a positive correlation between conflicts in life and cancer growth.

 The breast cancer patients in this study experienced different conflicts, such as the death of a loved one, a partner conflict, family struggles, financial problems, and so on.

Another study from the University of Helsinki, Finland, conducted a study of over 10,000 women. The scientists wanted to know whether stressful life events influenced breast cancer growth.

The women in the study received a questionnaire in 1981 to record their life events. The researchers identified 180 cases of breast cancer between 1982 and 1996. They found out that divorce, the death of a husband, a close relative, or a friend increased the risk of breast cancer.

I also looked at people around the world who died of breast cancer. I had a relative who died of breast cancer.   I don't know which breast she had breast cancer in. I only knew that she removed both her breasts.  

She first had breast cancer when her children were small, and then she prayed to God, even if she wasn't religious. She told God to make her live until her children were older.

Twenty-plus years later, she got breast cancer again. After her death, I learned that her relationship with her husband wasn't that great. On an emotional level, they were separated, even if they never divorced.

I believe she developed breast cancer because of her conflict with her husband. I knew she was right-handed, so the breast cancer must have started in the right breast. But maybe she also worried about her children and therefore got breast cancer in the left breast as well.

Recently, Olivia Newton-John died of breast cancer. She was a beloved singer and actress known for her role in Grease with John Travolta.

I looked at her story, and I learned that she first got diagnosed with breast cancer in 1992 when she was 44.

Olivia wrote a book about her life. I read her book to find any clues, and I discovered that in 1990, her friend Nancy's daughter, Colette, got kidney cancer. Colette was a friend of her daughter Chloe.

But sadly, Collette died of cancer when she was five years old, while Olivia was on tour in Spain. Olivia told in her book that she couldn't stop crying when she heard the bad news.

And in 1992, she felt a lump in her breast. Her doctor diagnosed her with lumpy breasts or fibrocystic breasts. Olivia found a lump in her right breast, but the mammogram revealed nothing.

Olivia was estrogen positive in situ, which means stage 0 breast cancer, and contained in the breast ducts. As I said before,  the emotional conflict of the breast ducts is a separation conflict.

This conflict could be about a partner or when Colette died. Olivia also talked about her relationship with her husband, Matt. By 1996, her relationship with her husband had gone bad for a long time. They were drifting apart from each other.

When the doctors found breast cancer in her right breast, including the nipple, they told Olivia that she had to remove it in what's called a modified radical mastectomy. When Olivia waited for the results, she and her sister Ronna got a call about her dad.

He got a liver cancer diagnosis and became very ill suddenly. In Olivia's book, she said that her dad read the paper and was sipping some coffee, and then all of a sudden, he went into a fetal position and could barely talk.

His liver cancer came from nowhere and shocked her family. Not soon later, Olivia visited her dad in Australia. And then she had to go to Los Angeles.

And sadly, her dad died on the 3rd of July, the same day as her brother's birthday. Olivia had no time to deal with her grief.

What's interesting is that her diagnosis came the same weekend her father died of cancer. I believe that the death of her dad and the struggle that she had with her husband might been the reason why she got breast cancer in her right breast.

Olivia underwent a partial mastectomy and had chemotherapy for nine months, and she also underwent breast reconstruction.

Another stressful situation she had was with her on-and-off boyfriend, Patrick McDermott. So she had been with him for eight years on and off. He was a cameraman. And then, one day, she received a call that Patrick was missing.  

He was gone on a fishing trip and was supposed to show up at a family get-together. Patrick was divorced from his former wife and was going to meet his children.

But when he went on the fishing trip, he went missing, and nobody found him. After this incident, Olivia felt emptiness, worried about him, and longed for answers.

In November 2005, four months after the disappearance of Patrick, the US Coast Guard said that he most likely drowned.

Olivia was interested in natural health, and she did herbal formulas, and meditation and focused on a vision of complete wellness. She went into remission for about 20 years. But then she fought a second battle with cancer in 2013.

And here is another interesting fact. In 2013, her sister Ronna started to act confused, and she seemed to be in another world.

Her family knew that there was something wrong with her. They took her to the hospital, and her family discovered that her sister had been diagnosed with a brain tumor when she was 72.

Prior to that, Rona was a healthy, fit person who exercised every day and ate healthily. And all of a sudden, she got a brain cancer diagnosis and became ill overnight.  

So Ronna passed after just six weeks, on the 24th of May in Australia, the same date as Olivia's mother's birthday. Olivia took the death of her sister very hard, and she didn't sing for eight months afterward.

 Olivia's breast cancer came back in 2013, the same year her sister died. I believe that her second round of breast cancer came after the death of her sister. Olivia said in her book that her cancer occurred each time she experienced something stressful in her life,

She got cancer for the third time in 2017, and she says that it was not unexpected. So, in this example, you can clearly see that when you experience something stressful with your friends and families and fear losing them or have different conflicts,  you can develop breast cancer. This clearly confirms what Dr. Hamer discovered about breast cancer and cancer in general.

If you want to learn how to let go of the emotional trauma behind breast cancer, you can download our guide, The Breast Cancer Healing Protocol, for free. In this document, you will learn how to heal the emotional causes of breast cancer.

You will also learn different natural remedies you can use, such as eating a healthy diet or other healthy habits you can follow. So, you can download this guide for free by clicking the link in the description box. Thank you for listening to this episode, and I'll see you in the next one.

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About the Show

The Cancer Wisdom Podcast teaches you how to treat cancer with natural remedies without using toxic treatments.

Discover how to take charge of your health and not be a slave to Big Pharma medicine.

Your host:

Simon Persson


Simon Persson is a holistic cancer blogger passionate about natural health remedies. When he is not blogging, he enjoys nature, cooking, sports, and learning about the latest gadgets on the market.

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